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Colorado River Generating Money and Jobs

Colorado River Generating Money and Jobs

DENVER (AP) -- A new report estimates recreational activity along the Colorado River and its tributaries contributes about $17 billion in direct spending per year.

The report was commissioned by Protect the Flows, which represents small businesses like fishing guides and others who rely on the Colorado River basin in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

The study was conducted by the economic research firm Southwick Associates. It estimates that business activity resulting from recreation focused on the river generates more than $1.6 billion in federal taxes annually and $1.6 billion in state and local tax revenues.

A 2006 study that Southwick conducted for the Outdoor Industry Foundation estimated outdoor recreation nationwide contributed $730 billion to the U.S. economy annually.

City Signs Lease for Solar Power Projects

City Signs Lease for Solar Power Projects

 

Boulder City signed a 50-year lease with a Korean Company allowing it to develop solar projects in the Eldorado Valley.

The Boulder City Council approved the agreement last month. The city and Korean Midland Power Company signed the lease Wednesday morning. The solar array will be on 1,550 acres of Eldorado Valley, which is 30 miles southeast of Las Vegas. The area is considered one of the best places in the country to develop solar power projects.

The array will be a 250 to 350 megawatt solar generation facility. The project will break ground in the middle of next year. Company representatives say the new facility will employee hundreds of people for construction and operation. The company plans on establishing a solar training center for local workers.

New Green Technology Developed in Boulder City

New Green Technology Developed in Boulder City

A Boulder City man showed off Thursday what he calls revolutionary green technology.

Richard Steinke has created a wind energy system that he says produces more power with less noise and fewer problems. His company, Wind Sail Receptor, will be producing wind energy systems with polyurethane blades which he says cut down on noise and suffer less damage.

"The existing technology with three blades was inappropriate, not the proper design nor the materials of the blades.  So, I went forward and came up with more of the idea of a wind sail type design," Richard Steinke said.

During a demonstration Thursday, the WSR-6 system was mounted to the bed of a two-ton truck to show that in a 45-mile-an-hour wind the generation system produces 6,000 watts of power. Traditional windmills of similar size produce just 1,000 watts of power in the same wind speed.