Our network

Environment

Section of Lower Colorado River designated as National Water Trail

Section of Lower Colorado River designated as National Water Trail

A section of the Lower Colorado River has been named a National Water Trail.

Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell announced the designation for the Black Canyon Water Trail Tuesday, making the waterway one of 16 nationally recognized water trails nationwide. It is the first water trail in the Southwest and the first through a desert.

Visitors can access the trail through a guided tour starting three different locations: at the base of Hoover Dam, Willow Beach, Arizona or the old mining town in Eldorado Canyon.

The water trail is 30 miles of stunning views of desert cliffs, colorful caves and sandy beaches. The trail also flows past items leftover from the construction of Hoover Dam, including gauging stations, catwalks and building foundations.

The Lower Colorado River Water Trail Alliance was formed in 2012 to pursue the water trail designation.

 

 

Water level at Lake Mead creates boating hazards

Water level at Lake Mead creates boating hazards

BOULDER CITY, Nev. (AP) -- Low water levels at Lake Mead are creating some hazards for boaters.

Navigation crews have set up buoys to warn boaters of rocks that have newly surfaced. Some ramps also are limited to smaller boats because of the more shallow water.

Lake Mead National Recreation Area spokeswoman Christie Vanover says while boaters might encounter hazards that didn't exist last year, the low water level has some advantages. She says the lake has more coves and beaches for recreation.

Some 300,000 people are expected to visit the lake over the Memorial Day holiday. The water level is 20 feet lower than this time last year.

 

 

New program to pay water users to take less from drought-stricken Colorado River

New program to pay water users to take less from drought-stricken Colorado River

A new approach to keeping more water in Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

Farmers, cities and power plant operators could soon be paid to cut their use of the Colorado River under a new interstate program aimed at keeping more water in Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

Read more in the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The nation’s most endangered waterway is in our backyard

The nation’s most endangered waterway is in our backyard

Environmental group says the all-important Colorado River is the most endangered river in the country.

Five lousy percent never looked so good.

But with the West gripped by a drought so severe it’s spurred talk of fallowed farms and emergency water restrictions in recent months, it’s practically worth celebrating that the snowpack that feeds the Colorado River is expected to produce 5 percent more water than average this year.

Read more in the Las Vegas Sun.

Volunteers needed for Great American Cleanup

You can help keep the natural wonder of southern Nevada looking spectacular by participating in the Great American Cleanup Saturday.

Between 9 a.m. and noon, volunteers will be removing litter at Government Wash. Individuals, families and organizations are welcome. Anyone under 18 years of age will need to complete a parental approval form.

The effort is part of a nationwide program where more than 4 million volunteers clean, beautify and improve 20,000 communities around the country. The events are sponsored by Keep America Beautiful.

For more information or to register, call (702) 293-8711. 

Cleanup Planned of Lower Colorado River

Cleanup Planned of Lower Colorado River

You will have a chance to help preserve the natural beauty of southern Nevada at an event this weekend.

The Lower Colorado River Water Trail Alliance and the National Park Service are working together to clean up a three-mile area of the river this weekend.

The effort will be between 9 a.m. and noon March 22. Volunteers will start with a sweep of the Willow Beach area. They will be cleaning up the area by canoe or kayak, foot and even by diving.

Registration is limited to the first 50 land volunteers, 50 divers and 50 kayakers. Volunteers need to register by calling (702) 293-8714.

The trail alliance is a collection of local businesses, public agencies, non-profits and individuals that are committed to protecting trails in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. 

Potentially Deadly Illness Found in Bighorn Sheep

Potentially Deadly Illness Found in Bighorn Sheep

Wildlife biologists say bighorn sheep herds living the Eldorado, McCullough and Spring Mountain ranges have a potentially deadly illness that had previously been found in other sheep herds in southern Nevada.

The sheep herds have a bacterial pneumonia that appears to have spread from the herd in the River Mountains, which are between Henderson and Boulder City.

To make matters worse, the herd living in the Spring Mountain area have a second type of pneumonia, which lead to a deadly outbreak among sheep in California.

Nevada Department of Wildlife biologist Pat Cummings calls the situation "a worst-case scenario." It is believed the illness was spread by bighorn rams that wander over a large area.

The illness can not spread to humans, but it is a major threat to efforts to bring back the populations of the bighorn sheep.