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Former Sen. Ted Stevens Dead; O'Keefe Survives Airplane Crash

WASHINGTON -- A plane carrying former Sen. Ted Stevens and eight others crashed in remote southwest Alaska, killing the longtime Republican lawmaker and four other people, authorities said Tuesday.

Ex-NASA chief Sean O'Keefe and his teenage son were also aboard and survived the crash, according to a former NASA spokesman.

Stevens' family has been notified that the 86-year-old was among those killed in the crash Monday night, family spokesman Mitch Rose told The Associated Press.

Rescuers arrived on helicopter early Tuesday and were giving medical care to survivors, Alaska National Guard spokesman Maj. Guy Hayes said. He offered no additional details, except that there were potential fatalities.

Alaska officials reported that nine people were aboard the aircraft and that "it appears that there are five fatalities," NTSB spokesman Ted Lopatkiewicz told The Associated Press in Washington.

More Businesses Moving to Downtown Las Vegas

LAS VEGAS -- The economy is tough, but some businesses are bucking the trend by expanding and relocating. And Downtown Las Vegas is getting a lot of attention.

After more than a year of searching for the perfect spot for her business, Michelle Dimauro, with Habit Design Studio, says she found it.

"Ever since we opened our business, we wanted to be in the Arts District," she said.

She isn't alone. Las Vegas Mayor Oscar Goodman says now more than ever, businesses are showing interest in relocating and even expanding to the downtown corridor, including the Arts District. Mayor Goodman says the city has pulled out all the stops in an effort to attract businesses to the area.

"All we can do is make it business friendly. We've waived all of the liquor license fees for these small taverns. We're changing our zoning requirements -- not making it as difficult," he said.

More Homeowners Opt to Do It Themselves

LAS VEGAS -- The do it yourself trend to home renovation is taking off and customers are saving hundreds in the process.

From landscaping to painting, Rebecca Smith is getting ready to tackle it all. She just bought a foreclosed home that needs a lot of work.

"A lot of cosmetic stuff that needed to be done. Leaking faucets, plumbing, the whole nine yards," she said.

Instead of hiring a professional, Smith says saving money is more of a priority. In an economy that forces people to watch every penny, the do it yourself trend is a necessity.

Home Depot supervisor Corwyn Frierson says the majority of their new customers are either fixing up a foreclosed home they just bought or are improving a home they're forced to stay in to make life a little more enjoyable.

More than 2 Million Cribs Recalled

WASHINGTON  -- More than 2 million cribs from Evenflo, Delta Enterprise Corp. and five other companies were recalled Thursday amid concerns that babies can suffocate, become trapped or fall from the cribs.

Most of the cribs were drop-sides, which have a side rail that moves up and down so parents can lift children from them more easily. That movable side, however, can malfunction or detach from the crib, creating a dangerous gap where babies' heads can become trapped, leading to suffocation or strangulation.

The other companies involved in the recall were Child Craft, Jardine Enterprises, LaJobi, Million Dollar Baby and Simmons Juvenile Products.

Click here for more from the Consumer Product Safety Commission

More Nevadans Turning to Food Stamps

LAS VEGAS - The economy is taking its toll on many Americans. A record number of people are now seeking food stamp assistance. The need is also growing in Nevada. According to the national non-profit Food Research and Action Center, Nevada is seeing a huge jump in the number of people applying for food stamps.

Yvette Reid is one of those people. Out of work for nearly two years, Reid gets about $200 a month in food stamps. With a 16-year-old son at home, she says the extra money is the only way she's able to put food on the table. "When you are used to living one way and now you have to live another, you have to save and scrounge," she said. "Food stamps are just such a help. If it wasn't for that, I don't know how my family would eat."

Program Gives First-Time Buyers Leg Up on Investors

LAS VEGAS -- Foreclosed homes in Las Vegas are being snatched up left and right by investors. But starting this week, Fannie Mae is trying to help homeowners get first dibs. The program is called First Look.

First Look allows first-time home buyers to place an offer first over an investor when buying a Fannie Mae-owned home. The window of opportunity has now been extended from 15 days to 30 days in Nevada.

At least 50-percent of the foreclosure sales in Las Vegas are cash only because banks see it as a hassle-free way to get the properties off their books.

With inventory at an all time low, and competition heating up, the First Look program can help people who don't have the cash to pay up front.

"(The) First Look program was Fannie Mae's program designed to strengthen communities and give first-time home buyers an edge," said Claudia Turcaz with the Nevada Association of Hispanic Real Estate.

More Details Surface in 14-Year-Old's Murder

LAS VEGAS -- A fight in a car may have led to the death of a teenage girl whose body was found near a day care center on Sunday.

Murder suspect Juan Rivera told police about the events surrounding the girl's death after he was arrested for murder, robbery and sexual assault. In a police report, Rivera told police he gave Diana Sotos a ride to a friend's house, and while they were waiting for the friend, he and Soto had a argument.

The police report also reveals that Rivera is the boyfriend of Soto's older sister and all of them were living in the same home.

Rivera told police that Soto scratched him and he he strangled her and dumped her body on East Owens. Rivera denies sexually assaulting the girl.