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Housing Market May Be Rebounding

LAS VEGAS -- As more people are finding new jobs, the housing market is getting a boost. Nationally, the number of people behind on their mortgage payments has dropped for the first time in four years.

Across the country, homeowners are finally starting to catch up with payments and experts say Las Vegas is improving as well.

"In the last 18 months, people have been faced with either, 'You make your mortgage payment or we take your house,' and a lot of people say, 'Ok, take my house because the mortgage is twice what the value is,' and that is starting to stop," said mortgage expert Roger Rothberg.

Thanks to some improvements in the job market, people are now catching up with payments. Those who can't afford the homes they're in have let them go, giving the battered housing market a chance to heal.

More Homeowners Falling Delinquent on Mortgages

LAS VEGAS -- The number of Southern Nevada homeowners delinquent on their mortgage payments has climbed steadily for the past several months. In some cases, it's people just willing to walk away from their homes, and in other cases, homeowners are holding out hope that they will get a loan modification.

In any given neighborhood, chances are good that a homeowner is the process of walking away from their mortgage. In the past, five months was typically the longest a homeowner could stay in their home until the bank would come knocking. But that is no longer the case.

Nick Nolf with The Nolf Group has been in the real estate business through the boom, the bust, and now the slow turn-around.

More than $19 Million in Unclaimed Tax Refunds

LAS VEGAS -- The IRS has more than $19 million in unclaimed refunds for Nevada taxpayers and the deadline to claim the money is nearing.

According to the IRS, the refunds are for people who did not file a tax return for 2006. The owed money equates to a median refund of about $575 for 19,000 taxpayers.

"There is about $19 million for about 19,400 Nevadans. The window of opportunity to claim this money is about to expire and they really need to act," said Jesse Weller, IRS.

To collect the money, a 2006 tax return must be filed by April 15, 2010.

"Why should I just let it go to the IRS?" said Steven Hansen a taxpayer who made the mistake of doing that once before. He's learned his lesson, and today it's a much different story.

"That could've been money for anything medical bills, even my rent."